Diseases Treatment

Symptoms, Causes and Cure for Diseases on A to Z Topics

Tumors of The Outer Ear – Treatment of Disease from Remedies Available

October 5th, 2007 by steve

Like all tumors, those of the outer ear may be either benign (unlikely to spread) or malignant(likely to spread and threaten life).On the visible ear, a benign tumor occurs as a painless wart. In the canal itself, it occurs as a hard growth of underlying bone tissue cal­led an osteoma. With an osteoma, there may be no symptoms at all, or an accumulation of wax, discomfort, and hearing loss.

Malignant tumors on the visible ear occur as warty growths, like benign tumors, or as ulcers or bleeding sores that fail to heal. Malignant tumors are like skin cancer. The cells multiply uncontrollably. They may bleed, and eventually become painful. Malignant tumors in the outer ear canal cause intense earache and bloody drainage.

The dangers of a malignant tumor are the same as those of any malignant growth. If you notice any of the symptoms described, see your physician

What is the Treatment?

Benign tumors can be removed in a minor surgical procedure. Malignant tumors located on the visible ear require either surgery or radiation therapy. During surgery, the tumor and all or part of the visible ear are removed. The operation is sometimes followed by further radiation therapy. Tumors in the canal may require an operation known as a mastoidectomy or temporal bone resection . This operation is followed by radiation therapy.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Outter Ear | No Comments »

Treatment Options Available for Curing Aneurysms Fast and Effectively

September 30th, 2007 by steve

An aneurysm is a permanent swelling of an artery due to a weakness in its wall. Aneurysms can form anywhere, but the most com­mon and troublesome sites are the arteries of the brain, and the aorta, the large major artery through which the heart pumps blood to the rest of the body. There are, basically, three reasons why an aneurysm might develop in one of your arteries:1. There are three layers of tissue in your arterial walls. The supportive strength of your arteries is supplied by the muscular middle layer, and this layer may be congenitally defective. The normal pressure of blood in the affected artery causes a balloon-like swelling, which is called a saccular aneurysm, to develop at that point. Aneurysms due to congenital defects are nearly always found in arteries at the base of the brain. Because of their shape and because several of them are often clustered together, they are known as “berry” aneurysms.

2. Inflammation, whatever the cause, may weaken an arterial wall. Most arterial inflammation is caused by disorders such as polyarteritis nodosa or bacterial endocarditis .

3. A portion of the muscular middle layer of an arterial wall may slowly degenerate as the result of a chronic condition such as atherosclerosis or high blood pressure . An aneurysm that is caused by atherosclerosis is likely to be a sausage­shaped swelling called a fusiform aneurysm that runs along a short length of the artery. A similar type of swelling may be caused by high blood pressure. Increased pressure of blood in an artery, however, can stretch the wall in many different ways. It can even split the layers, and force blood between them. This is called a dissecting aneurysm.

Aneurysms can cause trouble in several ways. They can burst, which leads to a loss of blood supply for certain tissues, and to hemorrhage, or internal bleeding, at the site of the aneurysm. They can swell so much that they press on and damage neighboring organs, nerves, or other blood vessels. They also can disturb the flow of blood to such an extent that its eddying and whirl pooling cause dangerous clots to form.

What are the Symptoms?

The symptoms of aneurysm vary according to the type, size, and location of the swelling. Berry aneurysms, or those at the base of the brain, usually cause no symptoms until they burst. A sudden severe headache at the back of your head, or even unconsciousness, may be the first sign of this type of aneurysm .

If you have an aneurysm of the aorta, your symptoms will depend on two factors: what section of the aorta is affected; and what type of aneurysm you have. The most common symptoms of a saccular or fusiform aneurysm in the thoracic aorta, or the portion of that artery that passes through your chest, are chest pain, hoarseness, difficulty in swallowing, and a persistent cough that is not helped by cough medicine. If you have a dissecting aneurysm in the same area of your aorta, you are likely to have pain that can easily be mistaken for a heart attack . In either case, you will not be able to see or feel the swelling on the surface of your chest, because your thoracic aorta is confined with in your rib cage.

A saccular or fusiform aneurysm in the abdominal portion of your aorta can usually be seen as a throbbing lump. Other symptoms include loss of appetite and loss of weight. If the aneurysm is located towards your back, it may press on the bones of your spine, and cause severe backache. Dissecting aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are relatively rare. When they do occur, the main symptom is severe abdominal pain. Aneurysms in other parts of the body are rare and generally of little consequence.

What are the Risks?

The major risk of an aneurysm is that it may burst, and cause a hemorrhage. A burst aneurysm allows blood to flow into the surrounding tissues, which causes serious local damage. Moreover, the entire circulatory system may collapse if the leak drastically reduces the volume of blood in the circulation. Unless expert medical help is available, a burst aneurysm in the aorta can be fatal. More than 40 per cent of all people who have a burst berry aneurysm die as a result.

Even when it does not burst, an aneurysm of the aorta causes turbulence in the flow of blood that can cause the formation of a thrombus, or clot, with all the associated dangers. Emboli, or parts of a blood clot that break away from the thrombus, can block smaller arteries such as those that supply the kidneys or other organs, and this can lead to many problems. Turbulence in the aorta also can stretch the aortic valve of the heart and cause aortic incompetence .

Aneurysms sometimes occur in more peripheral arteries, such as those of the arms and legs, but in these locations they are generally less hazardous.

What should be done?

You can do nothing about berry aneurysms, since you probably will not know that you have one unless it bursts. If you have any of the symptoms of an aneurysm of the aorta or if you inexplicably develop a lump anywhere on your body, especially on your abdomen, and particularly if it throbs, consult your physician immediately. Many of the symptoms can be caused by other, often trivial conditions, so the physician will probably want to give you a full examination before making a definite diagnosis. To find out the size, type and location of an aneurysm, if you have one, you may need to have extensive X-rays, chiefly to verify and locate the atherosclerosis that probably caused it. You may have to have arteriography and ultrasound tests to help identify the aneurysm.

What is the Treatment?

Self-help: The best ways to prevent aneurysms are to take steps to prevent or slow down atherosclerosis and to keep your high blood pressure under control . If you have already developed an aneurysm, there is no effective self-help.

Professional help: Surgery is the usual treatment for an aneurysm, but the surgeon must consider the location and size of the aneurysm and the condition of the rest of your arteries before recommending the procedure. The operation is difficult and risky.

What are the Long-Term Prospects?

About 30 per cent of people with ruptured berry aneurysms die instantly, and another15 per cent die from further bleeding within a few weeks. The outlook for long-term survival is excellent if you have a successful operation and live for six months after the first hemorrhage occurs.

Surgery for aneurysms of the thoracic aorta is often impossible, and in such cases the long-term outlook is poor. With operable chest aneurysms there is an 80 to 90 per cent chance of survival. Abdominal aneurysms are frequently a much less serious problem. In general, they need to be removed only if they are very large or if they are found to be growing. With or without surgery, the out­look is good for most of these. The same is true for aneurysms in peripheral arteries.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Circulation | No Comments »

Errors of Refraction – Treatment Options Available for Curing it Fast

September 28th, 2007 by steve

The way that light from objects is focused through the eye into an image on the retina is called refraction. In a normal eye, the point where the light focuses is exactly at the retina, and it is this precise focusing that assures that a clear image is seen. In some eyes, however, the eye focuses the light either behind or in front of the retina, so that the image is blurred.The four most common disorders of refraction are nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hypermetropia), astigmatism and presbyopia. Any of these disorders can be present in one or both eyes.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Errors Of Refraction | No Comments »

Treating Ankylosing Spondylitis

September 26th, 2007 by steve

What do doctor call this conditionRheumatoid Spondylitis

What is this Condition

A chronic, usually progressive inflammatory disease, ankylosing spondylitis affects the spine and adjacent soft tissue. Typically, the disease begins in the lower back and progresses up the spine to the neck. Deterioration of bone and cartilage can lead to fibrous tissue formation and eventual fusion of the spine or peripheral joints.

Ankylosing spondylitis is diagnosed more often in men, but may be equally prevalent in both sexes. Diagnosis is often overlooked or missed in women, who tend to show more peripheral joint involvement.

What Causes it?

Recent evidence strongly suggests a familial tendency in ankylosing spondylitis. The presence of human leukocyte antigen B27 (found in over 90% of people with this disease) and circulating immune complexes suggests immunologic activity.

What are its Symptoms?

The first is intermittent low back pain that’s usually most severe in the morning or after inactivity. Other symptoms depend on the disease stage and may include:

• stiffness and limited motion of the lumbar spine

• pain and limited chest expansion caused by involvement of the costovertebral joints

• arthritis involving shoulders, hips, and knees

• kyphosis (curvature of the spine) in advanced stages, caused by chronic stooping to relieve symptoms

• hip deformity with limited range of motion

• tenderness over the inflammation site

• mild fatigue, fever, loss of appetite or weight; occasional inflammation of the iris; aortic regurgitation and enlarged heart; upper lobe pulmonary fibrosis (which mimics tuberculosis).

These symptoms progress unpredictably, and the disease can disappear temporarily or permanently or flare up at any stage.

How is it Diagnosed?

Typical symptoms, family history, and blood tests showing human leukocyte antigen B27 strongly suggest ankylosing spondylitis. However, confirmation requires additional blood tests as well as X-rays.

How is it Treated?

No treatment reliably stops progression of this disease, so management aims to delay further deformity by enforcing good posture, stretching and deep-breathing exercises and, in some people, wearing braces and lightweight supports.

Anti-inflammatory pain relievers, such as aspirin, lndocin, Azulfidine, and Clinoril, control pain and inflammation.

Severe hip involvement usually requires hip replacement surgery . Severe spinal involvement may require a spinal wedge osteotomy (surgical cutting of bone) to separate and reposition the vertebrae. This surgery is performed only on selected people because of the risk of spinal cord damage and the long convalescence involved.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Immune Disorders | No Comments »

Hair and nails – Information and Treatment for the Disease

September 24th, 2007 by steve

Hair and nails are dead, hardened structures that are very similar to the surface layer of your skin. Hairs grow from follicles, which are pits of actively-dividing cells that occur in varying numbers in your skin. Nails grow from folds under your skin. The substance that gives both hair and nails their hardness is the protein keratin, which is found in smaller amounts in the skin itself. Because hair has little real function in human beings, diseases that affect it generally cause cosmetic and psychological problems rather than medical problems. Similarly, nail disorders can be unsightly and irritating but are not harmful to your physical health . Nevertheless, because appearance is usually of some importance to a feeling of well-being, hair and nail problems should be dealt with.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Nail disorders | No Comments »

Dandruff – Treatment Options Available for Treating the Disease

September 20th, 2007 by steve

Dandruff comes from small flakes of dead skin on the scalp, which appear whenever the skin cells of the scalp grow unusually fast. The two main causes of this are a mild form of seborrheic eczema, or, less commonly, psoriasis of the scalp. The hairs are not affected. Dandruff does not endanger health. It is simply unattractive.

What is The Treatment?

Self-help: Use an anti-dandruff shampoo, preferably one that contains tar. Follow the instructions on the container. Massage the shampoo well into the scalp, and rinse at least three times with dean water. This should dear up the dandruff within two weeks, but the condition often recurs.

Professional help: If the shampoo does not work, your physician may prescribe a lotion containing a steroid, to suppress the underlying cause of the dandruff. Use the lotion as directed, and you should have less dandruff.

If the scaling is thick and sticks to your scalp, your physician may prescribe a lotion containing salicylic acid or tar. The lotion loosens the dead skin and allows an anti-dandruff shampoo to work more effectively on removing it from the area.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Hair Disorders | No Comments »

Gallstones– Curing Page Name

September 17th, 2007 by steve


What do Doctors call this Condition?

Cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, cholesterolosis, biliary cirrhosis, gallstone ileus

What is this Condition?

Gallstones and other diseases of the gallbladder and bile duct are common, often painful conditions that usually require surgery to remove grainy deposits in the gallbladder and relieve inflammation. Gallstones may be life-threatening.

What Causes it?

Gallstones are caused by changes in the chemistry of the person’s bile, a greenish fluid secreted by the liver that aids in the absorption of fats. The stones are made of cholesterol, a mixture of calcium and bilirubin compounds, or a mixture of cholesterol and bilirubin pigment. Stones form when the gallbladder is sluggish because of pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, diabetes, celiac disease, cirrhosis of the liver, or pancreatitis.

Gallstones are the fifth leading cause of hospitalization among adults, accounting for 90% of all gallbladder and duct diseases. Most people recover with treatment unless they develop an infection, when recovery depends on its severity and how it responds to antibiotics.

Most gallbladder and bile duct diseases strike people between ages 20 and 50. The diseases are 6 times more common in women until after age 50, when they appear in both sexes about equally. The risk of getting these diseases increases with each succeeding decade. Each disorder can produce its own complications, the worst of which are perforations and infections in the abdominal cavity, which can lead to shock and death.

Types of Gallstones

Gallstone and bile duct diseases have a variety of sources and possible outcomes:

• One out of every ten people with gallstones develops choledocholithiasis, or gallstones in the common bile duct (sometimes called common-duct stones). Stones that have passed out of the gallbladder lodge in the liver and common bile ducts and block the flow of bile into the stomach. Most people recover with treatment unless infection occurs.

• Cholecystitis, acute or chronic inflammation of the gallbladder, is usually associated with a gallstone stuck in the cystic duct, causing painful distention of the gallbladder. Cholecystitis accounts for 10% to 25% of all people requiring gallbladder surgery. The acute form is most common during middle age; the chronic form, among elderly people. Most people recover with treatment.

• Cholesterolosis (cholesterol polyps or cholesterol crystal deposits in the gallbladder’s lining) may be caused by high cholesterol and low bile salts in bile secretions. The chance for cure is good with surgery.

• Biliary cirrhosis sometimes follows viral destruction of liver and duct cells, but the primary cause is unknown. This condition usually leads to obstructive jaundice. It strikes women ages 40 to 60 nine times more often than men. The chance of a cure is poor without a liver transplant.

• Gallstone ileus is caused by a gallstone that has lodged at the opening to the large intestine. This condition is more common in elderly people, and the chance of cure is good with surgery .

• Leftover gallstones or stricture of the common bile duct may occur in 1 % to 5% of all people whose gallbladders have been surgically removed and may produce abdominal pain, colic, fatty food intolerance, and indigestion. The chance of a cure is good with selected radiologic procedures, endoscopic procedures, or more surgery.

What are the Symptoms?

Although gallbladder diseases may produce no symptoms, most, at their worst, produce the symptoms of a classic gallbladder attack. The attacks often follow meals rich in fats or may occur at night, suddenly awakening the person. They begin with acute, upper right abdominal pain that may radiate to the back, between the shoulders, or to the front of the chest. The pain may be so severe that the person goes to a hospital emergency department for help. Other signs of gallbladder disease may include recurring fat intolerance, colic, belching, flatulence, indigestion, sweating, nausea, vomiting, chills, low-grade fever, jaundice (if a stone obstructs the common bile duct), and claycolored stools.

How is it Diagnosed?

Ultrasound and other tests can detect gallstones. Specific procedures include the following:

• Ultrasound detects stones in the gallbladder with 96% accuracy.

• Fluoroscopy distinguishes between gallbladder or bile duct disease and cancer of the pancreas in persons with jaundice.

• An endoscopy with a special dye is used to examine the common bile and pancreatic ducts. An endoscopy done through the mouth or rectum may also reveal stones.

• An injected radioisotope (HIDA) scan of the gallbladder detects obstruction of the cystic duct.

• Computed tomography (CAT) scan, although not used routinely, helps distinguish between jaundice with and without obstruction.

• A flat plate X-ray of the abdomen identifies calcified, but not cholesterol, stones with 15% accuracy.

• Blood tests help distinguish gallstone-related diseases from other diseases with some of the same symptoms, such as heart attack, ulcers, and hernia.

How is it Treated?

Treatment during an acute attack may include insertion of a nasogastric tube, an intravenous line and, possibly, antibiotics. Surgery, usually elective, is the doctor’s first recommendation for gallbladder and bile duct diseases. Surgery may be performed using an open procedure or a laparoscopic (using a small incision and a long tube) procedure to remove stones; the bile duct may also be explored.

Other Approaches

Other treatment includes a low-fat diet to prevent attacks and vitamin K for itching, jaundice, and bleeding tendencies.

In a recently developed nonsurgical treatment for choledocholithiasis, the surgeon inserts a flexible catheter into the common bile duct and, guided by fluoroscopy, moves the catheter toward the stone. A “Dormia” basket is threaded through the catheter, opened, twirled to entrap the stone, dosed, and withdrawn through the catheter.

Chenodiol, a drug that dissolves certain kinds of stones, may be given to persons who are either too weak for surgery or who refuse it. The drug has some drawbacks, however: It requires a prolonged course of treatment and causes serious side effects. What’s more, gallstones may recur after the drug is stopped.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Liver and Gallbladder Disorders | No Comments »

Causes and Some of the Symptoms of Hammer Toe

September 14th, 2007 by steve


What is this Condition?

In hammer toe, the big toe becomes crooked at the joint where it lines up with the other toes. The end of the bone is enlarged and a bunion (inflamed, thickened toe joint tissues) forms where it rubs the shoes. Hammer toe can cause a callus on the sole of the foot and make walking painful.

What Causes it?

Hammer toe may be inherited, but it more often develops in people with degenerative arthritis or in those who place prolonged pressure on the foot, especially from narrow-toed high-heels. That’s why hammer toe is more common in women. The condition also can develop in children who rapidly outgrow shoes and socks.

In congenital hammer toe, abnormal alignment of the bones (increased space between joints) causes bunion formation. In acquired hammer toe, the bone alignment is normal before the disorder occurs.

What are its Symptoms?

Hammer toe usually begins as a tender bunion covered by deformed, hard skin and a bump that feels distended with fluid. The first indication of hammer toe may be pain over the bunion from shoe pressure. The pain could come from injury-caused arthritis, bursitis, or abnormal stresses on the foot because hammer toe changes the way a person walks. In an advanced stage, the foot may appear flat and spread out, with severely curled toes and a small bunion on the fifth toe.

How is it Diagnosed?

A red, tender bunion makes hammer toe obvious. X-rays confirm the diagnosis by showing a crookedness of the big toe.

How is it Treated?

Depending on the severity, hammer toe may require the following treatment:

• In children (and some adults), repeated foot manipulation and splinting may relieve pain and correct hammer toe.

• If the disease progresses to severe deformity with disabling pain, the person may need surgery to remove the bunion. After surgery, the toe is immobilized in its corrected position with either a soft dressing or a short cast.

• After surgery, the person may need crutches for 4 to 6 weeks, or may simply learn to walk on his or her heels for a few days. The individual may be taught about physical therapy, such as applying warm compresses and soaks and doing exercises or yoga with phuket cleanse as well as using drugs to relieve pain and stiffness.

What can a Person with Hammer toe do?

In the very early stages of acquired hammer toe, good foot care and proper shoes may eliminate the need for further treatment.

A person can use felt pads to protect the bunion, foam pads or other devices to separate the first and second toes at night, and a supportive pad and exercises to strengthen the arch. Early treatment is vital if other foot problems caused by rheumatoid arthritis or diabetes are present.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Muscle and Bone Disorders | No Comments »

Mesothelioma

August 27th, 2007 by admin

Mesothelioma occurs in an individual when his body cells take an abnormal shape or simply go out of control. It is medically proven that the majority of people who suffer from mesothelioma have the dreaded cancer in their lungs’ lining. It may also be present in the lining of the heart or in the abdominal cavity peritonea. This mesothelioma information may be beneficial to you.

Even though safety norms have been established to ensure safety of employees who are prone to asbestos-related diseases, various companies have constantly ignored them for lucrative gains. If you or someone in your family has ever been a victim of mesothelioma, you can seek the experienced advice of our mesothelioma lawyers.

This website will help you to provide trusted, proven and reliable advice and lend a helping hand in the time of need. If you ever thought there was nowhere to turn, you just need to think twice. With our help, you can recover your past, present and future hospitalization and medical bills from your employer. Our experienced lawyers will file a lawsuit on your behalf and they will also help you to ascertain the legal aspect of your trauma and pain and make sure that you get the justice.

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Health | No Comments »

Subdural Hemorrhage And Hematoma : Causes | Symptoms | Treatment | Prevention Tips

August 22nd, 2007 by steve

In subdural hemorrhage blood leaks from vessels in the dura mater, the outermost of the three meninges, or membranous layersthat cover the brain. It differs from extradural hemorrhage in that the ruptured blood vessels are on the underside, rather than the outside, of the dura mater. Because these inner vessels are smaller than the outer ones, less blood is likely to leak out. The blood tends to seep quite slowly into the space between the dura mater and the arachnoid (the middle of the three meninges), and causes a hematoma, or collection of blood.Among eventual symptoms of subdural hemorrhage are drowsiness, confusion weakness or numbness down one side of the body, and persistent or recurrent headaches and nausea. During a period of days or weeks such symptoms may come and go, but they will gradually become worse.

Subdural hemorrhage occurs as a result of a head injury . It occurs most often in elderly people who have fallen. These people have sometimes forgotten about the accident by the time symptoms develop.

What Should be Done?

Consult your physician without delay if you develop the symptoms described above. Because they are similar to those of a minor stroke , be sure to tell the physician that you have recently injured your head, even if only slightly, if you remember any such incident. If any member of your family shows signs of mental deterioration and abnormal drowsiness, be sure that they see a physician. The affected person will probably be admitted to the hospital for diagnostic tests such as X-rays, arteriography, a radioisotope scan, and possibly a brain scan (known as CA T scan) to determine the cause of the symptoms. If the problem is diagnosed as subdural hemorrhage, treatment and chances for full recovery are similar to those of extradural hemorrhage .

If you like this post, take a moment to add it here: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Furl
  • Netscape
  • Spurl
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • YahooMyWeb

Category: Vescular Disorders | No Comments »